The Last Passover of JesusSource: http://bit.ly/1jKudei
By: James H. Charlesworth George L. Collord Professor of New Testament Language and Literature and director of the Dead Sea Scrolls Project at Princeton Theological Seminary
(image)Spring wildflowers in the Jerusalem forest.
In the Spring, Passover is time for reflective celebration. The great festival is also time for joyous expectation, as humans relish in the return of warm sunshine and blooming flowers. Passover (Hebrew pesaḥ; Greek páscha; Aramaic pisḥā˒) commemorates, in particular, when the plague passed over the homes of God’s people, as recounted in Exodus………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
The Last Passover of Jesus
Source: http://bit.ly/1jKudei

By: James H. Charlesworth George L. Collord Professor of New Testament Language and Literature and director of the Dead Sea Scrolls Project at Princeton Theological Seminary (image)Spring wildflowers in the Jerusalem forest. In the Spring, Passover is time for reflective celebration. The great festival is also time for joyous expectation, as humans relish in the return of warm sunshine and blooming flowers. Passover (Hebrew pesaḥ; Greek páscha; Aramaic pisḥā˒) commemorates, in particular, when the plague passed over the homes of God’s people, as recounted in Exodus………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

Behind the Scenes: Museum Photography at the Oriental InstituteSource: http://bit.ly/1mx2QHe
Recently Anna R. Ressman, Head of Photography at the Oriental Institute Museum, University of Chicago, shared a compelling article with me, and now I’m sharing it with you.
Here is a link to the Oriental Institute newsletter (PDF), which contains the article entitled, “Behind the Scenes: Museum Photography at the Oriental Institute.“
Anna describes the process in which five very different artifacts are documented, each with a unique challenge. And yes, you guessed it, one of those artifacts was documented using the RTI highlight method.
Documentation of the Egyptian stele………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
Behind the Scenes: Museum Photography at the Oriental Institute
Source: http://bit.ly/1mx2QHe

Recently Anna R. Ressman, Head of Photography at the Oriental Institute Museum, University of Chicago, shared a compelling article with me, and now I’m sharing it with you. Here is a link to the Oriental Institute newsletter (PDF), which contains the article entitled, “Behind the Scenes: Museum Photography at the Oriental Institute.“ Anna describes the process in which five very different artifacts are documented, each with a unique challenge. And yes, you guessed it, one of those artifacts was documented using the RTI highlight method. Documentation of the Egyptian stele………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

Medieval messing about on the riverSource: http://bit.ly/1poX5QL
(image)
Everyone hopes for fair weather over the Easter weekend but in 12th-century London it wasn’t just the rain that could get you wet at Easter – you might get a serious dunking in the River Thames. 
In William FitzStephen’s prologue to his biography of Thomas Becket, written in the 1170s, he included a description of London. In it he wrote that London was ‘most merry in its sports’. At Easter ‘naval tourneys’ were held on the river where a shield was tied to a ‘stout pole in mid-stream’. A young man holding a lance would stand in a small………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
Medieval messing about on the river
Source: http://bit.ly/1poX5QL

(image) Everyone hopes for fair weather over the Easter weekend but in 12th-century London it wasn’t just the rain that could get you wet at Easter – you might get a serious dunking in the River Thames. In William FitzStephen’s prologue to his biography of Thomas Becket, written in the 1170s, he included a description of London. In it he wrote that London was ‘most merry in its sports’. At Easter ‘naval tourneys’ were held on the river where a shield was tied to a ‘stout pole in mid-stream’. A young man holding a lance would stand in a small………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

Medieval crosses pendants, 11-13 centuries. Kievan Rus, Slavs, Byzantines, Vikings.

Medieval crosses pendants, 11-13 centuries.
Kievan Rus, Slavs, Byzantines, Vikings.

#10 Advice for New CRM Archaeologists: Keeping Busy During DowntimeSource: http://bit.ly/1i5hXrj
Chris Webster over at DigTech-LLC just posted another episode of his CRM Archaeology podcast  where some of the usual suspects covered topics including women working in CRM, social media advice for archaeologists, the government shutdown, and some great responses to a listener question: “What do techs do with themselves during work lulls?” I was not able to make it on the show for this episode but really wanted to offer my answer to that question.
The guests all had some great advice, both directly to the listener’s question, but also to the wider topic of how to prepare………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
#10 Advice for New CRM Archaeologists: Keeping Busy During Downtime
Source: http://bit.ly/1i5hXrj

Chris Webster over at DigTech-LLC just posted another episode of his CRM Archaeology podcast  where some of the usual suspects covered topics including women working in CRM, social media advice for archaeologists, the government shutdown, and some great responses to a listener question: “What do techs do with themselves during work lulls?” I was not able to make it on the show for this episode but really wanted to offer my answer to that question. The guests all had some great advice, both directly to the listener’s question, but also to the wider topic of how to prepare………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

It Was Forty Years Ago Today (On Getting Started in Archaeology)Source: http://bit.ly/KxCIOZ
(image)Send to Kindle 
Since it is December 25 as I write this, I know exactly where I was 40 years ago today: I was at my parents’ home in Geneva, New York for Christmas, following my first season of field experience in archaeology. I had looked forward to my fall field school class since the spring, when I learned I needed it as a requirement of summer employment on an archaeological field crew. Without it, I spent the summer working as a field assistant in the Department of Entomology at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station (apparently biology field schools are not required………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
It Was Forty Years Ago Today (On Getting Started in Archaeology)
Source: http://bit.ly/KxCIOZ

(image)Send to Kindle  Since it is December 25 as I write this, I know exactly where I was 40 years ago today: I was at my parents’ home in Geneva, New York for Christmas, following my first season of field experience in archaeology. I had looked forward to my fall field school class since the spring, when I learned I needed it as a requirement of summer employment on an archaeological field crew. Without it, I spent the summer working as a field assistant in the Department of Entomology at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station (apparently biology field schools are not required………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

Archaeology and Motherhood: Thoughts from the Trenches
Source: http://bit.ly/RfN2hT

My decision to have children came at a time when my graduate career as an archaeologist started to move forward.  I had successfully defended my dissertation proposal and I wrote several dissertation research grants in a very short timespan.  I also had high hopes of spending a year in Peru doing fieldwork for my dissertation.  But sometimes, the best experiences in life are the ones that cause you to veer off your chosen course.  As a new mother, this path led me to take a break from my research and devote myself to stay-at-home motherhood for two and a half years. I felt fortunate………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

Egypt on the Stage: A Tale of two QueensSource: http://bit.ly/1lwMZvq
Egypt has had many theatrical incarnations, one of the most famous, and my favourite, being Shakespeare’s epic The Tragedy of Anthony and Cleopatra, which forged a time defying reflection of Cleopatra Philopator, and Queen Elizabeth I, the Virgin Queen.
Most probably written around 1606 this play can be studied in conjunction with the preceding Macbeth as a play about monarchy, rulership and conquest. The two protagonists (Cleo. and Mac.) could be compared as a good and bad example of monarch; I like to think Cleopatra is definitely the paragon.
(image)Elizabeth Taylor as Cleopatra in 1963………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
Egypt on the Stage: A Tale of two Queens
Source: http://bit.ly/1lwMZvq

Egypt has had many theatrical incarnations, one of the most famous, and my favourite, being Shakespeare’s epic The Tragedy of Anthony and Cleopatra, which forged a time defying reflection of Cleopatra Philopator, and Queen Elizabeth I, the Virgin Queen. Most probably written around 1606 this play can be studied in conjunction with the preceding Macbeth as a play about monarchy, rulership and conquest. The two protagonists (Cleo. and Mac.) could be compared as a good and bad example of monarch; I like to think Cleopatra is definitely the paragon. (image)Elizabeth Taylor as Cleopatra in 1963………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

A  Special Day OutSource: http://bit.ly/PnkTn4
During the winter months there isn’t much to do here in Crete as most  Museums and  tourist shops are closed. Now spring is here everything comes to life and tourists begin to arrive. So John and I decided to go to the Archaeological Museum of Siteia where there is a renewed Exhibition. We were especially interested as John and I had helped with conservation of some of the vessels displayed in the museum, while at the Institute for Aegean Prehistory Study Center for East Crete.
The Archaeological Museum of Siteia, like all the local museums of Greece constructed………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
A Special Day Out
Source: http://bit.ly/PnkTn4

During the winter months there isn’t much to do here in Crete as most  Museums and  tourist shops are closed. Now spring is here everything comes to life and tourists begin to arrive. So John and I decided to go to the Archaeological Museum of Siteia where there is a renewed Exhibition. We were especially interested as John and I had helped with conservation of some of the vessels displayed in the museum, while at the Institute for Aegean Prehistory Study Center for East Crete. The Archaeological Museum of Siteia, like all the local museums of Greece constructed………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

Church Monuments in Wales 4: Corwen’s Early Medieval MonumentsSource: http://bit.ly/1reVo3J
The Cambrian Archaeological Association Easter Conference on ‘Church Monuments in Wales’ visited Corwen on Saturday afternoon, and got to see two early medieval stones in the churchyard. These are both catalogued by Professor Nancy Edwards in her A Corpus of Early Medieval Inscribed Stones and Stone Sculpture in Wales Volume III North Wales and these comments derived from her research. But first, let’s discuss a weird stone in the church porch wall…
(image)Corwen cross-shaft with Corwen College behind
(image)MR 3
In the exterior west-wall of the south………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
Church Monuments in Wales 4: Corwen’s Early Medieval Monuments
Source: http://bit.ly/1reVo3J

The Cambrian Archaeological Association Easter Conference on ‘Church Monuments in Wales’ visited Corwen on Saturday afternoon, and got to see two early medieval stones in the churchyard. These are both catalogued by Professor Nancy Edwards in her A Corpus of Early Medieval Inscribed Stones and Stone Sculpture in Wales Volume III North Wales and these comments derived from her research. But first, let’s discuss a weird stone in the church porch wall… (image)Corwen cross-shaft with Corwen College behind (image)MR 3 In the exterior west-wall of the south………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project