A Lummi Reef Net ModelSource: http://bit.ly/1t4I72k
(image)Lummi Reef Netting Model. Source: http://whatcomwatch.org/wpww/?p=348
A while back I found the cool picture above in an online exhibit of the Whatcom Museum showing photographs of Point Roberts and Lummi Island, on Puget Sound just south of the Canadian border.  Reef netting is a peculiarly Straits Salish technology which involved the setting of complex nets, suspended between two canoes, at strategic locations where the natural flow of salmon was constrained. A sort of on-ramp led the fish up to the net by creating a gentle optical illusion of a rising bottom.  When the salmon………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
A Lummi Reef Net Model
Source: http://bit.ly/1t4I72k

(image)Lummi Reef Netting Model. Source: http://whatcomwatch.org/wpww/?p=348 A while back I found the cool picture above in an online exhibit of the Whatcom Museum showing photographs of Point Roberts and Lummi Island, on Puget Sound just south of the Canadian border.  Reef netting is a peculiarly Straits Salish technology which involved the setting of complex nets, suspended between two canoes, at strategic locations where the natural flow of salmon was constrained. A sort of on-ramp led the fish up to the net by creating a gentle optical illusion of a rising bottom.  When the salmon………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

Old Routes through Ross-shire: Luib, near Achnasheen, to Scardroy in StrathcononSource: http://bit.ly/1uzJZwS
by Meryl Marshall (NOSAS)
A six mile stretch of rough moorland, west of Achnasheen, is traversed by what was once a well made road generally 3 metres in width. Although it has fallen into disuse and is travelled only by the occasional walker, possibly doing a coast to coast trip, the road today is very distinct and forms a pleasant days’ ramble, especially when combined with an outward journey to Achnasheen on the Kyle of Lochalsh train (with homeward transport parked at Scardroy). But what are the origins of the road? and why did it fall out of use?
A route through Strathconon to Loch Carron………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
Old Routes through Ross-shire: Luib, near Achnasheen, to Scardroy in Strathconon
Source: http://bit.ly/1uzJZwS

by Meryl Marshall (NOSAS) A six mile stretch of rough moorland, west of Achnasheen, is traversed by what was once a well made road generally 3 metres in width. Although it has fallen into disuse and is travelled only by the occasional walker, possibly doing a coast to coast trip, the road today is very distinct and forms a pleasant days’ ramble, especially when combined with an outward journey to Achnasheen on the Kyle of Lochalsh train (with homeward transport parked at Scardroy). But what are the origins of the road? and why did it fall out of use? A route through Strathconon to Loch Carron………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

Shefford 2014 Higher Education Field Academy (HEFA)Source: http://bit.ly/1wlvkrD
 (image)An additional field academy was run for Bedfordshire Middle School students in the town of Shefford last week, marking the end of the 2014 excavation season for ACA.
 Robert Bloomfield Academy, Henlow Church of England Academy and Etonbury Academy are member schools of Bedfordshire East Schools Trust (BEST) Archaeological Society. Their students dug six archaeological test pit excavations supervised by ACA in 2012 and this year, 64 Year 7 and 8 students were involved in digging another 13 pits in Shefford. Lee Thomas, a teacher at Robert Bloomfield and founding Chairman of BEST Archaeological………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
Shefford 2014 Higher Education Field Academy (HEFA)
Source: http://bit.ly/1wlvkrD

(image)An additional field academy was run for Bedfordshire Middle School students in the town of Shefford last week, marking the end of the 2014 excavation season for ACA. Robert Bloomfield Academy, Henlow Church of England Academy and Etonbury Academy are member schools of Bedfordshire East Schools Trust (BEST) Archaeological Society. Their students dug six archaeological test pit excavations supervised by ACA in 2012 and this year, 64 Year 7 and 8 students were involved in digging another 13 pits in Shefford. Lee Thomas, a teacher at Robert Bloomfield and founding Chairman of BEST Archaeological………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

ICE AGE SPEARPOINT COPIED WITH SPACE AGE TECHNOLOGYSource: http://bit.ly/121UHp9
(image)Plastic copy of Clovis fluted point made from a lasar scan. Except for color and weight, it’s an exact replica.
The Ohio History Connection has begun the process of scanning selected artifacts with lasar beams in order to create near perfect 3D digital models of the objects.
These digital models can be reproduced in plastic using a 3D printer allowing us to generate as many copies as we want from a digital “mold” that will never wear out. These reproductions can be used as hands-on educational resources or sales items for the museum shop.
(image)Replica Clovis point with………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
ICE AGE SPEARPOINT COPIED WITH SPACE AGE TECHNOLOGY
Source: http://bit.ly/121UHp9

(image)Plastic copy of Clovis fluted point made from a lasar scan. Except for color and weight, it’s an exact replica. The Ohio History Connection has begun the process of scanning selected artifacts with lasar beams in order to create near perfect 3D digital models of the objects. These digital models can be reproduced in plastic using a 3D printer allowing us to generate as many copies as we want from a digital “mold” that will never wear out. These reproductions can be used as hands-on educational resources or sales items for the museum shop. (image)Replica Clovis point with………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

Women and Weaving in the Ancient Near EastSource: http://bit.ly/1CNWxoW
From earliest times in the Near East, women were the producers of cloth for garments and usage inside the home. In ancient Mesopotamia activities relating to the production of cloth were ideologically linked with women and femininity. Some archaeologists suggest that increasing poverty due to the annexation of privately owned land left many families and women in particular, with no choice but to offer themselves for employment within (or be sent to) these powerful estates. Women were the acceptable labour force for the production of textiles as there was, within Mesopotamia, an ideology that linked………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
Women and Weaving in the Ancient Near East
Source: http://bit.ly/1CNWxoW

From earliest times in the Near East, women were the producers of cloth for garments and usage inside the home. In ancient Mesopotamia activities relating to the production of cloth were ideologically linked with women and femininity. Some archaeologists suggest that increasing poverty due to the annexation of privately owned land left many families and women in particular, with no choice but to offer themselves for employment within (or be sent to) these powerful estates. Women were the acceptable labour force for the production of textiles as there was, within Mesopotamia, an ideology that linked………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

A Prehistoric A-Z: The Coldrum StonesSource: http://bit.ly/1rol0uv
We visited the Coldrum Stones previously, about 3.5 years years ago, so it’s time for a revisit as part of our occasional A-Z series.
The best preserved of the Medway Megaliths, Coldrum is a Neolithic Longbarrow, one of several in this part of
the country. Recent radiocarbon dating of at least 16 individuals buried within the chamber at Coldrum, has shown that this particular monument was probably constructed nearly 6,000 years ago. This date from Coldrum makes it one of the earliest known monuments in the British Isles. Similar dates have been suggested for the Early Neolithic Long Hall………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
A Prehistoric A-Z: The Coldrum Stones
Source: http://bit.ly/1rol0uv

We visited the Coldrum Stones previously, about 3.5 years years ago, so it’s time for a revisit as part of our occasional A-Z series. The best preserved of the Medway Megaliths, Coldrum is a Neolithic Longbarrow, one of several in this part of the country. Recent radiocarbon dating of at least 16 individuals buried within the chamber at Coldrum, has shown that this particular monument was probably constructed nearly 6,000 years ago. This date from Coldrum makes it one of the earliest known monuments in the British Isles. Similar dates have been suggested for the Early Neolithic Long Hall………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

Roman mosaics from the National Archaeological Museum of Spain, MadridSource: http://bit.ly/1DtkqEe
Two weeks ago I returned to Madrid to visit the new Archaeological Museum. Spain’s National Archaeological Museum reopened to the public six months ago after a massive six-year revamp that aimed at offering a state-of-the-art space for its collection of ancient artefacts. A total of 13,000 objects are on display in 40 rooms in a neoclassical building in the heart of Madrid.
(image)National Archaeological Museum of Spain, Madrid © Carole Raddato
The museum spans the history of humans on the Iberian peninsula. The periods covered range from prehistory to the nineteenth century and include Iberian………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
Roman mosaics from the National Archaeological Museum of Spain, Madrid
Source: http://bit.ly/1DtkqEe

Two weeks ago I returned to Madrid to visit the new Archaeological Museum. Spain’s National Archaeological Museum reopened to the public six months ago after a massive six-year revamp that aimed at offering a state-of-the-art space for its collection of ancient artefacts. A total of 13,000 objects are on display in 40 rooms in a neoclassical building in the heart of Madrid. (image)National Archaeological Museum of Spain, Madrid © Carole Raddato The museum spans the history of humans on the Iberian peninsula. The periods covered range from prehistory to the nineteenth century and include Iberian………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

Old Photos of Irish Archaeological Sites from the British Royal CollectionSource: http://bit.ly/1vVRYdl
I recently stumbled across some fantastic old images of Irish archaeological sites, which are now stored at the British Royal Collection. The photos were taken in 1861 and 1903 during two royal visits to Ireland, when firstly Queen Victoria and subsequently her son Edward VII toured the country.  A selection of the photos can be viewed below, while further old images of Ireland can viewed here: old photos of Ireland 1, old photos of Ireland 2, old photos of Ireland 3 and old photos of Ireland 4.
 
(image)The round tower at Kildare town in 1861 (Royal Collection Trust/©………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
Old Photos of Irish Archaeological Sites from the British Royal Collection
Source: http://bit.ly/1vVRYdl

I recently stumbled across some fantastic old images of Irish archaeological sites, which are now stored at the British Royal Collection. The photos were taken in 1861 and 1903 during two royal visits to Ireland, when firstly Queen Victoria and subsequently her son Edward VII toured the country.  A selection of the photos can be viewed below, while further old images of Ireland can viewed here: old photos of Ireland 1, old photos of Ireland 2, old photos of Ireland 3 and old photos of Ireland 4.   (image)The round tower at Kildare town in 1861 (Royal Collection Trust/©………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

Discovering Identity: Weavers and Figurine Makers?Source: http://bit.ly/1r08JgA
As mentioned in previous posts, the context in which artifacts are found is crucial to their interpretation. Of all the sites in the Upper Euphrates Valley where figurines of the 7th century have been found, only Tell Ahmar provides, to date, a stratigraphically secure and well-documented deposit. Unfortunately, the circumstances under which the figurines from Deve Hüyük, Kefrik and Merj Khamis were acquired prevent contextual analysis, while the excavation reports of the Yunus Cemetery and Carchemish mention only briefly the find spots of their figurines.
More recently, excavations in………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
Discovering Identity: Weavers and Figurine Makers?
Source: http://bit.ly/1r08JgA

As mentioned in previous posts, the context in which artifacts are found is crucial to their interpretation. Of all the sites in the Upper Euphrates Valley where figurines of the 7th century have been found, only Tell Ahmar provides, to date, a stratigraphically secure and well-documented deposit. Unfortunately, the circumstances under which the figurines from Deve Hüyük, Kefrik and Merj Khamis were acquired prevent contextual analysis, while the excavation reports of the Yunus Cemetery and Carchemish mention only briefly the find spots of their figurines. More recently, excavations in………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

CAP and Punk ArchaeologySource: http://bit.ly/1FoT0kS
On September 30th the book Punk Archaeology was published under a creative commons license for free download, and it is a very interesting read.  You might be asking, what is punk archaeology and what does it have to do with campus archaeology?  These two terms, at first glance, may seem to clash but they work very well together. When I found this book it screamed read me, tell everyone about me!  Not just because it spoke to my inner punk (I still have my combat boots and patch covered jacket), but also because it offers a fresh voice and perspective on the discipline of archaeology……….. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
CAP and Punk Archaeology
Source: http://bit.ly/1FoT0kS

On September 30th the book Punk Archaeology was published under a creative commons license for free download, and it is a very interesting read.  You might be asking, what is punk archaeology and what does it have to do with campus archaeology?  These two terms, at first glance, may seem to clash but they work very well together. When I found this book it screamed read me, tell everyone about me!  Not just because it spoke to my inner punk (I still have my combat boots and patch covered jacket), but also because it offers a fresh voice and perspective on the discipline of archaeology……….. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project