The Process of Discovery: Preparing Llandeilo’s Bronze Age Cremations for AnalysisSource: http://bit.ly/1sVXiIy
At Rubicon there is a team constantly working on archaeological processing. We have a facility which includes flotation tanks, drying rooms, sorting and storage areas that allows us to tackle numerous types of samples. Currently they are working their way through samples taken from prehistoric cremation burials excavated at Lovelodge Farm in Llandeilo, Carmarthenshire.
(image)The Bronze Age features under excavation at Lovelodge Farm, Carmarthenshire (Rubicon Heritage)
The majority of the features excavated at Lovelodge Farm are likely to date to the Bronze Age (c. 2000- 700 BC). A Bronze Age Barrow………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
The Process of Discovery: Preparing Llandeilo’s Bronze Age Cremations for Analysis
Source: http://bit.ly/1sVXiIy

At Rubicon there is a team constantly working on archaeological processing. We have a facility which includes flotation tanks, drying rooms, sorting and storage areas that allows us to tackle numerous types of samples. Currently they are working their way through samples taken from prehistoric cremation burials excavated at Lovelodge Farm in Llandeilo, Carmarthenshire. (image)The Bronze Age features under excavation at Lovelodge Farm, Carmarthenshire (Rubicon Heritage) The majority of the features excavated at Lovelodge Farm are likely to date to the Bronze Age (c. 2000- 700 BC). A Bronze Age Barrow………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

Ur Digitization Project: August 2014Source: http://bit.ly/1B3T0DX
Deep Pits and Early Burials
Spotlight on 31-17-404: Ubaid Period Skeleton from Ur
More about the rediscovered skeleton from grave PFG/Z
On August 5, 2014, the Penn Museum released a press announcement about a 6,500-year-old skeleton in its collection that had been reconnected to a key piece of its history by the Ur Digitization Project. The announcement captured imaginations worldwide and we have been inundated with questions about it. So, what better topic for this month’s Ur blog than this, the earliest skeleton preserved from the site of Ur?
(image)31-17-404 in its original shipping crate……….. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
Ur Digitization Project: August 2014
Source: http://bit.ly/1B3T0DX

Deep Pits and Early Burials Spotlight on 31-17-404: Ubaid Period Skeleton from Ur More about the rediscovered skeleton from grave PFG/Z On August 5, 2014, the Penn Museum released a press announcement about a 6,500-year-old skeleton in its collection that had been reconnected to a key piece of its history by the Ur Digitization Project. The announcement captured imaginations worldwide and we have been inundated with questions about it. So, what better topic for this month’s Ur blog than this, the earliest skeleton preserved from the site of Ur? (image)31-17-404 in its original shipping crate……….. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

Dispatches from Iraqi Kurdistan: Survey Far Beyond the Hilly FlanksSource: http://bit.ly/Y4oxYu
Survey in the newly opened archaeological frontier of Iraqi Kurdistan comes with many challenges. Other reports from University of Pennsylvania graduate students on the project about various aspects of our work have been put up on the Beyond the Museum Walls blog but my own work deals specifically with the survey in our area. This season of the Rowanduz Archaeological Project (RAP) included excavations at Banahilk, Gird-i Dasht, Sidekan Bank and Gund-i Topzawa as well as survey in the area of Sidekan. These excavations uncovered material spanning from the Neolithic to the Ottoman periods and make………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
Dispatches from Iraqi Kurdistan: Survey Far Beyond the Hilly Flanks
Source: http://bit.ly/Y4oxYu

Survey in the newly opened archaeological frontier of Iraqi Kurdistan comes with many challenges. Other reports from University of Pennsylvania graduate students on the project about various aspects of our work have been put up on the Beyond the Museum Walls blog but my own work deals specifically with the survey in our area. This season of the Rowanduz Archaeological Project (RAP) included excavations at Banahilk, Gird-i Dasht, Sidekan Bank and Gund-i Topzawa as well as survey in the area of Sidekan. These excavations uncovered material spanning from the Neolithic to the Ottoman periods and make………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

The prehistory of New World Arctic (Raghavan et al. 2014)Source: http://bit.ly/1pvFrKA
(image)Science 29 August 2014: Vol. 345 no. 6200 DOI: 10.1126/science.1255832 The genetic prehistory of the New World ArcticMaanasa Raghavan et al. (image)(image)The New World Arctic, the last region of the Americas to be populated by humans, has a relatively well-researched archaeology, but an understanding of its genetic history is lacking. We present genome-wide sequence data from ancient and present-day humans from Greenland, Arctic Canada, Alaska, Aleutian Islands, and Siberia. We show that Paleo-Eskimos (~3000 BCE to 1300 CE) represent a migration pulse into the Americas independent of both………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
The prehistory of New World Arctic (Raghavan et al. 2014)
Source: http://bit.ly/1pvFrKA

(image)Science 29 August 2014: Vol. 345 no. 6200 DOI: 10.1126/science.1255832 The genetic prehistory of the New World ArcticMaanasa Raghavan et al. (image)(image)The New World Arctic, the last region of the Americas to be populated by humans, has a relatively well-researched archaeology, but an understanding of its genetic history is lacking. We present genome-wide sequence data from ancient and present-day humans from Greenland, Arctic Canada, Alaska, Aleutian Islands, and Siberia. We show that Paleo-Eskimos (~3000 BCE to 1300 CE) represent a migration pulse into the Americas independent of both………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

Archaeology at the border: Survey and excavation in Xinjiang (continued)Source: http://bit.ly/1lnLa42
As we approach the end of the field season, with 2 weeks remaining, the cold weather  also begins to settle in. Since I last wrote, the grass has yellowed, leaving flocks of sheep and cow to scavenge from what is left from a summer much drier than prior years. The rainmakers had to be called in to induce precipitation by dispersing silver iodide into the clouds.
(image)Up goes the rocket and down comes the rain.
We are currently excavating the twenty graves we exposed at the site of Adonqolu this season. The site lies on the gentle south-facing slopes between two mountain ranges (please refer………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
Archaeology at the border: Survey and excavation in Xinjiang (continued)
Source: http://bit.ly/1lnLa42

As we approach the end of the field season, with 2 weeks remaining, the cold weather  also begins to settle in. Since I last wrote, the grass has yellowed, leaving flocks of sheep and cow to scavenge from what is left from a summer much drier than prior years. The rainmakers had to be called in to induce precipitation by dispersing silver iodide into the clouds. (image)Up goes the rocket and down comes the rain. We are currently excavating the twenty graves we exposed at the site of Adonqolu this season. The site lies on the gentle south-facing slopes between two mountain ranges (please refer………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

Nina Frances Layard – Something Indeed for a Lady to Have Done.
Source: http://bit.ly/1CcXo4X

Today we’re going to talk about Nina Francis Layard and also to some degree her partner in life Mary Frances Outman. Though Mary seems to have played a traditional wifely role to Nina’s more outgoing and adventurous stereotypical male role, I do not want to downplay Mary’s contributions to Nina’s work. Before we get too far I wanted to be understood that Mary transcribed a great deal of what Nina wrote. This is not to say that Nina’s work was not her own, it’s just to say that Nina would not have accomplished as much as she had without Mary’s help. That………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

LiDAR Scans and Sacred Lakes: A Report from the 2014 Summer Season at Abydos- Part 2Source: http://bit.ly/1pTvE09
(image)The Malih in the late 19th Century. Photo from Auguste Mariette, L’Egypt de Mariette: Voyage en Egypte par Auguste Mariette Pacha (Editions Errance: 1999), planche 33
In my previous post, I talked about the technological methods utilized in Abydos this season. Another major part of my season at Abydos was to do a preliminary investigation of the sacred lake associated with the Osiris temple. The remnants of this sacred lake, known now as the Malih or the Salty, survived into the 20th Century until it was filled in and covered by houses. Even though a few scholars from the 19th  and………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
LiDAR Scans and Sacred Lakes: A Report from the 2014 Summer Season at Abydos- Part 2
Source: http://bit.ly/1pTvE09

(image)The Malih in the late 19th Century. Photo from Auguste Mariette, L’Egypt de Mariette: Voyage en Egypte par Auguste Mariette Pacha (Editions Errance: 1999), planche 33 In my previous post, I talked about the technological methods utilized in Abydos this season. Another major part of my season at Abydos was to do a preliminary investigation of the sacred lake associated with the Osiris temple. The remnants of this sacred lake, known now as the Malih or the Salty, survived into the 20th Century until it was filled in and covered by houses. Even though a few scholars from the 19th  and………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

Museum piece #16 – Cat. 22690Source: http://bit.ly/1wv59TB
(image)Vatican Museums Cat. 22690 Naophorous statue of Udjahorresnet (Source: Author).
Earlier this month as a part of my honeymoon, I had the immense pleasure of visiting the wonderful treasure trove that is the Vatican Museums. Of course, I was heading straight for the Egyptian antiquities in the Museo Gregoriano Egizio (although I visited and thoroughly enjoyed many of the other amazing exhibits as well), and I was not disappointed as I stepped into the galleries. 
The very first piece to catch my eye was an old friend of mine, the naophorous statue of the Late Period official, Udjahorresnet,………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
Museum piece #16 – Cat. 22690
Source: http://bit.ly/1wv59TB

(image)Vatican Museums Cat. 22690 Naophorous statue of Udjahorresnet (Source: Author). Earlier this month as a part of my honeymoon, I had the immense pleasure of visiting the wonderful treasure trove that is the Vatican Museums. Of course, I was heading straight for the Egyptian antiquities in the Museo Gregoriano Egizio (although I visited and thoroughly enjoyed many of the other amazing exhibits as well), and I was not disappointed as I stepped into the galleries. The very first piece to catch my eye was an old friend of mine, the naophorous statue of the Late Period official, Udjahorresnet,………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

Who needs an osteologist? (Installment 16)Source: http://bit.ly/1rvScGK
It’s the first day of classes here at UWF, which means a fresh crop of undergraduates in my Human Osteology class.  And with perfect timing, here’s the case of the 38-year-old ectopic pregnancy that has been making the rounds on the various social media I frequent.  It’s a pretty interesting case, and the MRI seems to show a fetal skeleton (inasmuch as I have no professional training in reading an MRI).  The Daily Mail carried a photo, though, of the doctors’ attempt at rearticulating the skeleton.  And these doctors most definitely need an osteologist:(image)It’s an insanely………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
Who needs an osteologist? (Installment 16)
Source: http://bit.ly/1rvScGK

It’s the first day of classes here at UWF, which means a fresh crop of undergraduates in my Human Osteology class.  And with perfect timing, here’s the case of the 38-year-old ectopic pregnancy that has been making the rounds on the various social media I frequent.  It’s a pretty interesting case, and the MRI seems to show a fetal skeleton (inasmuch as I have no professional training in reading an MRI).  The Daily Mail carried a photo, though, of the doctors’ attempt at rearticulating the skeleton.  And these doctors most definitely need an osteologist:(image)It’s an insanely………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

"Intelligent Design" "Science" in Paleolithic Archaeology? I’m Shocked.Source: http://bit.ly/1loe7x2
It’ll come as no surprise to you that I just can’t let the “Handaxe as Art” and “Levallois Technique as Science” crowd get too complacent.Wait! I misspoke. I meant that I can’t let them continue in their complacency without now and again reminding them that they’re on very shaky empirical ground.Today, I’m going to try a new tack. So different, in fact, that I think it’s positively brilliant. [I might as well—it’s unlikely they’ll think so!]Okay. Here it comes. To say that the shape of a so-called hand axe is predetermined is tantamount to claiming that the God of Abraham created every living………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
"Intelligent Design" "Science" in Paleolithic Archaeology? I’m Shocked.
Source: http://bit.ly/1loe7x2

It’ll come as no surprise to you that I just can’t let the “Handaxe as Art” and “Levallois Technique as Science” crowd get too complacent.Wait! I misspoke. I meant that I can’t let them continue in their complacency without now and again reminding them that they’re on very shaky empirical ground.Today, I’m going to try a new tack. So different, in fact, that I think it’s positively brilliant. [I might as well—it’s unlikely they’ll think so!]Okay. Here it comes. To say that the shape of a so-called hand axe is predetermined is tantamount to claiming that the God of Abraham created every living………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project