Being Present for Archaeology (A Perspective from the Trowel’s Edge)Source: http://bit.ly/1waaEqv
(image)Kindle 
After completing the recent 4-week archaeological data recovery program in Coxsackie, I heard that my field technicians liked that I worked with them and explained regularly (perhaps incessantly) what we were doing and what our findings meant to the interpretation of local archaeology.  To me, it seemed natural that I would work this way.  I would not have done it differently, although I am aware that sometimes in CRM archaeology the Principal Investigator (PI) isn’t present for much of the fieldwork, and reports may be written by people who weren’t there………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
Being Present for Archaeology (A Perspective from the Trowel’s Edge)
Source: http://bit.ly/1waaEqv

(image)Kindle  After completing the recent 4-week archaeological data recovery program in Coxsackie, I heard that my field technicians liked that I worked with them and explained regularly (perhaps incessantly) what we were doing and what our findings meant to the interpretation of local archaeology.  To me, it seemed natural that I would work this way.  I would not have done it differently, although I am aware that sometimes in CRM archaeology the Principal Investigator (PI) isn’t present for much of the fieldwork, and reports may be written by people who weren’t there………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

Dig Diary – Wednesday, August 6, 2014Source: http://bit.ly/1BcOwvI
(image)The walls in the area south of Structure One (top left). Structure Eleven (top centre), Structure Twelve (bottom right) and central standing stone (bottom centre).
Day Eighteen
This is day two of the diary pottery special – largely because the Ness is being pounded, at the minute, by heavy rain (as Lorna laments below) and digging has been brought to an abrupt and slippery halt.
This gives us time to assess the stunning pottery finds of the morning.
(image)The miniature pot from the central midden area.
The first ceramic to surprise the folk in the finds hut is a beautiful, tiny and………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
Dig Diary – Wednesday, August 6, 2014
Source: http://bit.ly/1BcOwvI

(image)The walls in the area south of Structure One (top left). Structure Eleven (top centre), Structure Twelve (bottom right) and central standing stone (bottom centre). Day Eighteen This is day two of the diary pottery special – largely because the Ness is being pounded, at the minute, by heavy rain (as Lorna laments below) and digging has been brought to an abrupt and slippery halt. This gives us time to assess the stunning pottery finds of the morning. (image)The miniature pot from the central midden area. The first ceramic to surprise the folk in the finds hut is a beautiful, tiny and………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

Bones of contention: The global trade in archaeological and ethnographic human remainsSource: http://bit.ly/1rfywGV
(image)These days, research on the depth and breadth of the global illicit antiquities trade, and how best to dismantle and prevent it, grows ever-more diverse. One particularly under-studied aspect continues to fascinate me: the trade in archaeological and ethnographic human remains. With licit and clearly illicit faces, deals conducted online (but most likely primarily off-line), this trade forms but one component of a vast global “red market“- the vast, legal and illegal trade in organs, tissues, eggs, blood, even children.
The existence of this trade is especially………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
Bones of contention: The global trade in archaeological and ethnographic human remains
Source: http://bit.ly/1rfywGV

(image)These days, research on the depth and breadth of the global illicit antiquities trade, and how best to dismantle and prevent it, grows ever-more diverse. One particularly under-studied aspect continues to fascinate me: the trade in archaeological and ethnographic human remains. With licit and clearly illicit faces, deals conducted online (but most likely primarily off-line), this trade forms but one component of a vast global “red market“- the vast, legal and illegal trade in organs, tissues, eggs, blood, even children. The existence of this trade is especially………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

Press Release: Luas Works Reveal Multiple Human Remains at College GreenSource: http://bit.ly/1uHJFRx
(image)One of the individuals under excavation at College Green (Copyright: Rubicon Heritage Services Ltd)
On 16 July during Luas Cross City works on College Green, monitoring archaeologists from Rubicon Heritage Services Ltd, working on behalf of the Railway Procurement Agency made a discovery of human remains. The archaeological team located an individual at a depth of 1.5m below the present ground surface, immediately north of the gates of Trinity College, Dublin. The individual was situated below the known level of post-medieval activity, suggesting the remains are most likely medieval or earlier………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
Press Release: Luas Works Reveal Multiple Human Remains at College Green
Source: http://bit.ly/1uHJFRx

(image)One of the individuals under excavation at College Green (Copyright: Rubicon Heritage Services Ltd) On 16 July during Luas Cross City works on College Green, monitoring archaeologists from Rubicon Heritage Services Ltd, working on behalf of the Railway Procurement Agency made a discovery of human remains. The archaeological team located an individual at a depth of 1.5m below the present ground surface, immediately north of the gates of Trinity College, Dublin. The individual was situated below the known level of post-medieval activity, suggesting the remains are most likely medieval or earlier………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

Twenty Percent: ISIS “Khums” Tax on Archaeological Loot Fuels the Conflicts in Syria and IraqSource: http://bit.ly/1rfFUSM
(image)
Early Sunday morning, a Twitter account associated with ISIS posted a horrifying photo gallery documenting the group’s destruction of religious sites.
The images show the demolition of several shrines in the Iraqi city of Mosul, which fell to ISIS forces on June 1oth. Similar pictures and videos, touted by ISIS and its supporters via social media, have in recent months galvanized the world’s outrage and inspired rebellion in the local population.
Those dramatic images obscure a far larger and more alarming pattern of destruction, experts say: the………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
Twenty Percent: ISIS “Khums” Tax on Archaeological Loot Fuels the Conflicts in Syria and Iraq
Source: http://bit.ly/1rfFUSM

(image) Early Sunday morning, a Twitter account associated with ISIS posted a horrifying photo gallery documenting the group’s destruction of religious sites. The images show the demolition of several shrines in the Iraqi city of Mosul, which fell to ISIS forces on June 1oth. Similar pictures and videos, touted by ISIS and its supporters via social media, have in recent months galvanized the world’s outrage and inspired rebellion in the local population. Those dramatic images obscure a far larger and more alarming pattern of destruction, experts say: the………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

The Crowning of the LionSource: http://bit.ly/1pVFj3h
Deep in a single square metre of trench D at Landsjö castle, on the inner edge of the dry moat, we found five identical coins. Boy are they ugly. They’re thin, brittle, made of a heavily debased silver alloy and struck only from one side; they bear no legend and the image at the centre is incomprehensible. But I love them anyway, because they offer a tight date: this coin type was struck for King Valdemar Birgersson c. 1250-75. And the first written mention of Landsjö dates from 1280, so it all works out.
Valdemar became king because he had an extremely powerful and ruthless father,………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
The Crowning of the Lion
Source: http://bit.ly/1pVFj3h

Deep in a single square metre of trench D at Landsjö castle, on the inner edge of the dry moat, we found five identical coins. Boy are they ugly. They’re thin, brittle, made of a heavily debased silver alloy and struck only from one side; they bear no legend and the image at the centre is incomprehensible. But I love them anyway, because they offer a tight date: this coin type was struck for King Valdemar Birgersson c. 1250-75. And the first written mention of Landsjö dates from 1280, so it all works out. Valdemar became king because he had an extremely powerful and ruthless father,………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

Dig Diary – Tuesday, August 5, 2014Source: http://bit.ly/1r0dzQj
(image)Initial clean of Structure Eight after the covers were removed from its north end.
Day Seventeen
Today was pottery day at the Ness. Aren’t you lucky? Okay, we’re biased, but those who moan about yet another pottery sherd emerging from the midden to add to the thousands already in the Orkney College stores should reflect on the fate of Trench T.
This enormous, deep and not-wholly-entrancing trench on the far side of the house of Lochview has been sliding into disrepute. To be more accurate, it has been sliding into the Iron Age.
This is not what is wanted, or expected, from any………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
Dig Diary – Tuesday, August 5, 2014
Source: http://bit.ly/1r0dzQj

(image)Initial clean of Structure Eight after the covers were removed from its north end. Day Seventeen Today was pottery day at the Ness. Aren’t you lucky? Okay, we’re biased, but those who moan about yet another pottery sherd emerging from the midden to add to the thousands already in the Orkney College stores should reflect on the fate of Trench T. This enormous, deep and not-wholly-entrancing trench on the far side of the house of Lochview has been sliding into disrepute. To be more accurate, it has been sliding into the Iron Age. This is not what is wanted, or expected, from any………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

From the Bronze Age to the First World War, via the Anglo-SaxonsSource: http://bit.ly/XaBrUf
It’s been nearly a week since the last blog post and I have taken the opportunity to hide from the rain again to write another post and bring you up to date with our discoveries.
(image)Rebecca widens the April ring ditch slot to 2 metres
If you have been following our Twitter feed or Facebook page you will have seen that it is quite prehistory-heavy this week! Not only have we started to excavate into the barrow ditch, but the five cremations discovered in the centre of  the barrow in April have at last been lifted.
(image)Niall and Andrew prepare a cremation urn for block-lifting
In………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
From the Bronze Age to the First World War, via the Anglo-Saxons
Source: http://bit.ly/XaBrUf

It’s been nearly a week since the last blog post and I have taken the opportunity to hide from the rain again to write another post and bring you up to date with our discoveries. (image)Rebecca widens the April ring ditch slot to 2 metres If you have been following our Twitter feed or Facebook page you will have seen that it is quite prehistory-heavy this week! Not only have we started to excavate into the barrow ditch, but the five cremations discovered in the centre of  the barrow in April have at last been lifted. (image)Niall and Andrew prepare a cremation urn for block-lifting In………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

Mortuary Selfies: Photos from Among the TombsSource: http://bit.ly/1pxRrJ9
(image)Ruth photographing memorials in the cloister of Canterbury Cathedral
There is much outrage and indignation about the proliferation of ‘selfies’ extending into mortuary and dark touristic realms in the media of late. Boundaries of ‘taste’ have been infringed apparently. With this in mind, and nearing the completion of Strand 1 of the Past in its Place project, with a forthcoming exhibition about our work planned at Exeter Cathedral, it seems a post some photographs of the project team exploring the memorials and tombs of English and Welsh cathedrals.
As part of the………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
Mortuary Selfies: Photos from Among the Tombs
Source: http://bit.ly/1pxRrJ9

(image)Ruth photographing memorials in the cloister of Canterbury Cathedral There is much outrage and indignation about the proliferation of ‘selfies’ extending into mortuary and dark touristic realms in the media of late. Boundaries of ‘taste’ have been infringed apparently. With this in mind, and nearing the completion of Strand 1 of the Past in its Place project, with a forthcoming exhibition about our work planned at Exeter Cathedral, it seems a post some photographs of the project team exploring the memorials and tombs of English and Welsh cathedrals. As part of the………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

Grade Inflation in UK ArchaeologySource: http://bit.ly/1peGWeO
Over the last few days I have been writing about grade inflation and how it affects job prospects and the causes of it. The reason I have been writing about grade inflation is because I took a look at the data from the UK and found it in Archaeology degrees. Here are the final marks, first degrees i.e. undergrads, for Archaeology degrees in the Humanities.
 
(image)Grades- Archaeology H&P
Up, Up, and Away We Go
The lower second, ’2:1′, has decreased significantly in the last decade and a half. For my American readers here is a conversion table to UK grades to………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
Grade Inflation in UK Archaeology
Source: http://bit.ly/1peGWeO

Over the last few days I have been writing about grade inflation and how it affects job prospects and the causes of it. The reason I have been writing about grade inflation is because I took a look at the data from the UK and found it in Archaeology degrees. Here are the final marks, first degrees i.e. undergrads, for Archaeology degrees in the Humanities.   (image)Grades- Archaeology H&P Up, Up, and Away We Go The lower second, ’2:1′, has decreased significantly in the last decade and a half. For my American readers here is a conversion table to UK grades to………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project