Dig Diary – Thursday, July 24, 2014Source: http://bit.ly/1l6OOde
(image)Structure Twelve and the central midden area from Hugo’s kite camera.
Day Nine
(image)The latest polished stone spatula from Structure Eight, modelled by Andy.
We must admit it. Many of us have listened to the stories of colleagues who have worked in wonderful sunny countries like Greece or Jordan, Italy or Portugal and thought how wonderful it would be to excavate in a warm place.
How wrong we were. The weather here at the Ness (yes, the weather again) is positively tropical and, for northern persons, just a bit too tropical at that.
If you think we exaggerate, just refer to Kaitlin………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
Dig Diary – Thursday, July 24, 2014
Source: http://bit.ly/1l6OOde

(image)Structure Twelve and the central midden area from Hugo’s kite camera. Day Nine (image)The latest polished stone spatula from Structure Eight, modelled by Andy. We must admit it. Many of us have listened to the stories of colleagues who have worked in wonderful sunny countries like Greece or Jordan, Italy or Portugal and thought how wonderful it would be to excavate in a warm place. How wrong we were. The weather here at the Ness (yes, the weather again) is positively tropical and, for northern persons, just a bit too tropical at that. If you think we exaggerate, just refer to Kaitlin………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

What can you do? Sharing knowledge about Iraq’s vanishing cultural heritageSource: http://bit.ly/1rJsE8d
A public panel, “The Implications of the Current Fighting for Iraq’s Cultural Heritage”was held on Friday evening, July 18, 2014 in Washington, DC. The panel was organized by the Iraqi Cultural Center (ICC), the Iraqi Ministry of Culture and The American Academic Research Institute in Iraq (TAARII). The following is a report of the presentations.
The goal of this panel was to focus on the current situation in Iraq, particularly on the cultural impact of the fighting which broke out in the beginning of 2014. From the beginning it was clear that the implications for the future of………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
What can you do? Sharing knowledge about Iraq’s vanishing cultural heritage
Source: http://bit.ly/1rJsE8d

A public panel, “The Implications of the Current Fighting for Iraq’s Cultural Heritage”was held on Friday evening, July 18, 2014 in Washington, DC. The panel was organized by the Iraqi Cultural Center (ICC), the Iraqi Ministry of Culture and The American Academic Research Institute in Iraq (TAARII). The following is a report of the presentations. The goal of this panel was to focus on the current situation in Iraq, particularly on the cultural impact of the fighting which broke out in the beginning of 2014. From the beginning it was clear that the implications for the future of………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

Book Review: Ancient Lives, New Discoveries: Eight Mummies, Eight Stories.Source: http://bit.ly/1tceOf1
The British Museum in London is currently playing host to the Ancient Lives, New Discoveries exhibition, from the 22nd of May to the 30th of November 2014, which focuses on the innovative use of non-destructive CT scanning to digitally unwrap and investigate eight individual mummies who spread the span of ancient Egyptian and Sudanese history.  It is a unique opportunity to explore the individual bodies and mummy styles, from a naturally preserved desiccated corpse from 3500 BC, right up to the late richly decorated and individualised Roman period mummies of the 1st to 3rd centuries AD and………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
Book Review: Ancient Lives, New Discoveries: Eight Mummies, Eight Stories.
Source: http://bit.ly/1tceOf1

The British Museum in London is currently playing host to the Ancient Lives, New Discoveries exhibition, from the 22nd of May to the 30th of November 2014, which focuses on the innovative use of non-destructive CT scanning to digitally unwrap and investigate eight individual mummies who spread the span of ancient Egyptian and Sudanese history.  It is a unique opportunity to explore the individual bodies and mummy styles, from a naturally preserved desiccated corpse from 3500 BC, right up to the late richly decorated and individualised Roman period mummies of the 1st to 3rd centuries AD and………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

How long was the average Roman stride?Source: http://bit.ly/1ntq6bM
(image)Eric Poehler (@Pompeiana79) posed this question on Twitter this morning. Katy Meyers (@BonesDoNotLie) and Keith Chan (@ChekeiChan) commented that there are formulae to estimate stride based on height. The forensic articles I found were actually going in the reverse — from footfalls/strides to height (which makes sense if you want to find a murder, for example).  Keith suggested exercise medicine articles, and the most often-quoted article, Hatano, Y. “Use of the pedometer for promoting daily walking exercise.” International Council for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
How long was the average Roman stride?
Source: http://bit.ly/1ntq6bM

(image)Eric Poehler (@Pompeiana79) posed this question on Twitter this morning. Katy Meyers (@BonesDoNotLie) and Keith Chan (@ChekeiChan) commented that there are formulae to estimate stride based on height. The forensic articles I found were actually going in the reverse — from footfalls/strides to height (which makes sense if you want to find a murder, for example).  Keith suggested exercise medicine articles, and the most often-quoted article, Hatano, Y. “Use of the pedometer for promoting daily walking exercise.” International Council for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

How long was the average Roman foot, and what was their shoe size?Source: http://bit.ly/1rDPPke
Archaeologist Eric Poehler just keeps coming with the questions about Roman walking and feet.  Today, he wanted to know the size of the Roman foot.  In my last post, I’d kind of given up on the idea of figuring out foot size, since I didn’t think I had any foot measurements.  Then I remembered this morning that of course I have calcaneus maximum length.  The trick was to find a formula using calcaneus maximum length to approximate foot size.(image)Sandaled foot from the Augustan period (Met Museum)This was more difficult than you’d think.  There are a metric TON of articles………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
How long was the average Roman foot, and what was their shoe size?
Source: http://bit.ly/1rDPPke

Archaeologist Eric Poehler just keeps coming with the questions about Roman walking and feet.  Today, he wanted to know the size of the Roman foot.  In my last post, I’d kind of given up on the idea of figuring out foot size, since I didn’t think I had any foot measurements.  Then I remembered this morning that of course I have calcaneus maximum length.  The trick was to find a formula using calcaneus maximum length to approximate foot size.(image)Sandaled foot from the Augustan period (Met Museum)This was more difficult than you’d think.  There are a metric TON of articles………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

Lost cities and looted tombs: Studying artifact smuggling in BelizeSource: http://bit.ly/1s6hIl4
On last year’s day of archaeology I was 3700 feet above sea level, studying the looting of Andean churches. This year I am in the Central American jungle conducting fieldwork on artifact smuggling in Belize.
This post was written for the Day of Archaeology 2014.
[The image above shows the looting of a large Maya temple front at the site of Placeres, Mexico: it is literally being sawed off. Read about the looting and trafficking of this facade on the Trafficking Culture website. Photo by permission of the person who took it.]
This job is exciting to say the least
(image)
Although I am an archaeologist………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
Lost cities and looted tombs: Studying artifact smuggling in Belize
Source: http://bit.ly/1s6hIl4

On last year’s day of archaeology I was 3700 feet above sea level, studying the looting of Andean churches. This year I am in the Central American jungle conducting fieldwork on artifact smuggling in Belize. This post was written for the Day of Archaeology 2014. [The image above shows the looting of a large Maya temple front at the site of Placeres, Mexico: it is literally being sawed off. Read about the looting and trafficking of this facade on the Trafficking Culture website. Photo by permission of the person who took it.] This job is exciting to say the least (image) Although I am an archaeologist………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

Syrian Archaeology, ‘Scale of the Scandal’Source: http://bit.ly/1sL99fM
By : Michel Al-Maqdissi
Introduction
The Syrian crisis has recently become noticeably more serious, and has turned into one of the most alarming situations in the Near East since the end of the Iraq War. The consequences to archaeology will be seen in the short and long term.
(image)Apamea, 20 July 2011
In the short term, damage is occurring due to the increasing number of thefts of antiquities, illegal excavations, paralysed and wrecked museums and a halt to fieldwork. In the long term it will be affected by the massive exodus of trained archaeologists at the Direction Générale………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
Syrian Archaeology, ‘Scale of the Scandal’
Source: http://bit.ly/1sL99fM

By : Michel Al-Maqdissi Introduction The Syrian crisis has recently become noticeably more serious, and has turned into one of the most alarming situations in the Near East since the end of the Iraq War. The consequences to archaeology will be seen in the short and long term. (image)Apamea, 20 July 2011 In the short term, damage is occurring due to the increasing number of thefts of antiquities, illegal excavations, paralysed and wrecked museums and a halt to fieldwork. In the long term it will be affected by the massive exodus of trained archaeologists at the Direction Générale………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

Kurdish Heritage on the Fast TrackSource: http://bit.ly/1nheCbW
By: Michael D. Danti
The Situation Today
Following decades of quiescence, these are exciting times for archaeology in the KRG (Kurdistan Regional Government). And over the last four years, American archaeologists and cultural heritage experts have witnessed firsthand the rapid development of the cultural heritage situation in Iraqi Kurdistan.
Kurdish heritage experts are undertaking ambitious research and conservation projects across Erbil, Sulaimaniya, Dohuk, and Halabja Governates. At the same time, the KRG Directorate General of Antiquities, headed by Mala Awat (Abubakir O. Zainadin), has provided………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
Kurdish Heritage on the Fast Track
Source: http://bit.ly/1nheCbW

By: Michael D. Danti The Situation Today Following decades of quiescence, these are exciting times for archaeology in the KRG (Kurdistan Regional Government). And over the last four years, American archaeologists and cultural heritage experts have witnessed firsthand the rapid development of the cultural heritage situation in Iraqi Kurdistan. Kurdish heritage experts are undertaking ambitious research and conservation projects across Erbil, Sulaimaniya, Dohuk, and Halabja Governates. At the same time, the KRG Directorate General of Antiquities, headed by Mala Awat (Abubakir O. Zainadin), has provided………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

Imagine all the Vikings, Living Life in Peace….Source: http://bit.ly/1oRd0me
The eighth-century English ecclesiastic Alcuin wrote: ‘Pagans have desecrated God’s sanctuary, laid waste the house of our hope and trampled the bodies of saints like dung in the streets…”.
He wasn’t lying; indeed he was perhaps the most frank Anglo-Saxon writer we know. Alchie (as he was probably called by his closest drinking buds) wasn’t referring to the traffic of elderly tourists and pilgrims that shuffle around Lindisfarne today buying gallons of the local mead. No, he was of course describing (and thus creating) the infamous massacre of monks and………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
Imagine all the Vikings, Living Life in Peace….
Source: http://bit.ly/1oRd0me

The eighth-century English ecclesiastic Alcuin wrote: ‘Pagans have desecrated God’s sanctuary, laid waste the house of our hope and trampled the bodies of saints like dung in the streets…”. He wasn’t lying; indeed he was perhaps the most frank Anglo-Saxon writer we know. Alchie (as he was probably called by his closest drinking buds) wasn’t referring to the traffic of elderly tourists and pilgrims that shuffle around Lindisfarne today buying gallons of the local mead. No, he was of course describing (and thus creating) the infamous massacre of monks and………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

SEXUAL HARASSMENT IS A BIG PROBLEM IN ARCHAEOLOGYSource: http://bit.ly/1nC36SN
(image)A new study of sexual harassment in scientific fields has revealed disturbing if hardly surprising results. Sexual harassment in scientific fieldwork settings is occurring at alarming frequencies and too many men are oblivious to the problem.
A large majority (72%) of all respondents to the survey reported that “they had directly observed or been told about the occurrence of other field site researchers and/or colleagues making inappropriate or sexual remarks at their most recent or most notable field site.” And sadly “men were more likely to report that comments never………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
SEXUAL HARASSMENT IS A BIG PROBLEM IN ARCHAEOLOGY
Source: http://bit.ly/1nC36SN

(image)A new study of sexual harassment in scientific fields has revealed disturbing if hardly surprising results. Sexual harassment in scientific fieldwork settings is occurring at alarming frequencies and too many men are oblivious to the problem. A large majority (72%) of all respondents to the survey reported that “they had directly observed or been told about the occurrence of other field site researchers and/or colleagues making inappropriate or sexual remarks at their most recent or most notable field site.” And sadly “men were more likely to report that comments never………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project