On the Origin of Our Specimens: The Down YearsSource: http://bit.ly/1qYWJgU
(image)‘The Thirteen’
The collection of specimens, known since 1997 as the Grant Museum of Zoology, was started in 1827 by Robert E. Grant. Grant was the first professor of zoology at UCL when it opened, then called the University of London, and he stayed in post until his death in 1874. The collections have seen a total of 13 academics in the lineage of collections care throughout the 187 year history of the Grant Museum, from Robert E. Grant himself, through to our current Curator Mark Carnall.
Both Grant and many of his successors have expanded the collections according to their………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
On the Origin of Our Specimens: The Down Years
Source: http://bit.ly/1qYWJgU

(image)‘The Thirteen’ The collection of specimens, known since 1997 as the Grant Museum of Zoology, was started in 1827 by Robert E. Grant. Grant was the first professor of zoology at UCL when it opened, then called the University of London, and he stayed in post until his death in 1874. The collections have seen a total of 13 academics in the lineage of collections care throughout the 187 year history of the Grant Museum, from Robert E. Grant himself, through to our current Curator Mark Carnall. Both Grant and many of his successors have expanded the collections according to their………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

Charterhouse (Crossrail) excavations on a Black Death cemeterySource: http://bit.ly/RxdnYX
(image)Danse macabreRecent excavations at the Charterhouse, of a burial ground given to accommodate Plague victims, as been in the news and on telly.See: http://www.channel4.com/programmes/return-of-the-black-death-secret-history/4od TV, which also examines the wider context of the plague in London and the potential for pneumonic plague. See also the counter argument for the role of human fleas in plague transmission  and BBC News  ,”In March 2013, Crossrail engineers uncovered 25 skeletons in a 5.5m-wide shaft - alongside pottery dated to the mid-14th Century.Samples………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
Charterhouse (Crossrail) excavations on a Black Death cemetery
Source: http://bit.ly/RxdnYX

(image)Danse macabreRecent excavations at the Charterhouse, of a burial ground given to accommodate Plague victims, as been in the news and on telly.See: http://www.channel4.com/programmes/return-of-the-black-death-secret-history/4od TV, which also examines the wider context of the plague in London and the potential for pneumonic plague. See also the counter argument for the role of human fleas in plague transmission  and BBC News  ,”In March 2013, Crossrail engineers uncovered 25 skeletons in a 5.5m-wide shaft - alongside pottery dated to the mid-14th Century.Samples………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

mtDNA history of Oceania (Duggan et al. 2014)
Source: http://bit.ly/1gSPfsC

AJHG doi:10.1016/j.ajhg.2014.03.014 Maternal History of Oceania from Complete mtDNA Genomes: Contrasting Ancient Diversity with Recent Homogenization Due to the Austronesian Expansion Ana T. Duggan et al. Archaeology, linguistics, and existing genetic studies indicate that Oceania was settled by two major waves of migration. The first migration took place approximately 40 thousand years ago and these migrants, Papuans, colonized much of Near Oceania. Approximately 3.5 thousand years ago, a second expansion of Austronesian-speakers arrived in Near Oceania and the descendants of these people spread………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

Is it ever acceptable for museums to lie?Source: http://bit.ly/1hVn79h
I ask this question to our Museum Studies Masters students every year, and last month put it to our new Bachelor of Arts and Sciences students. Despite the difference in the age, background and interests of these two groups, the reaction is the same – anger and horror. I am playing devil’s advocate in these debates, but my own opinion is yes, there are circumstances when everyone benefits from museums lying.
The lectures I discuss this in focus on object interpretation, and I use a tiger skull as a prop for discussing how to decide what information to include in labels. The choice of………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
Is it ever acceptable for museums to lie?
Source: http://bit.ly/1hVn79h

I ask this question to our Museum Studies Masters students every year, and last month put it to our new Bachelor of Arts and Sciences students. Despite the difference in the age, background and interests of these two groups, the reaction is the same – anger and horror. I am playing devil’s advocate in these debates, but my own opinion is yes, there are circumstances when everyone benefits from museums lying. The lectures I discuss this in focus on object interpretation, and I use a tiger skull as a prop for discussing how to decide what information to include in labels. The choice of………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

IBD sharing between modern humans, Denisovans and Neandertals
Source: http://bit.ly/1qVt6Nv

bioRxiv doi:doi: 10.1101/003988 Sharing of Very Short IBD Segments between Humans, Neandertals, and Denisovans Gundula Povysil, Sepp Hochreiter We analyze the sharing of very short identity by descent (IBD) segments between humans, Neandertals, and Denisovans to gain new insights into their demographic history. Short IBD segments convey information about events far back in time because the shorter IBD segments are, the older they are assumed to be. The identification of short IBD segments becomes possible through next generation sequencing (NGS), which offers high variant density and reports variants………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

Going underground: Heat treatment of silcrete in South Africa during the Middle Stone AgeSource: http://bit.ly/RukT6O
The seminal work by Brown et al. (2009) showed that heat treating silcrete (a silica rich rock type) was a practice of Middle Stone Age (MSA) humans in southern Africa. This was done to enhance the flakeability of naturally occurring silcretes, which in their un-heated forms are less workable (Mourre et al., 2010). The Brown et al. experiments added another cognitive / technological marker to the accumulating list of characteristics (including mastic production, projectile weapons technologies, site maintenance behaviors and the production of symbolic objects) showing that MSA humans had well developed………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
Going underground: Heat treatment of silcrete in South Africa during the Middle Stone Age
Source: http://bit.ly/RukT6O

The seminal work by Brown et al. (2009) showed that heat treating silcrete (a silica rich rock type) was a practice of Middle Stone Age (MSA) humans in southern Africa. This was done to enhance the flakeability of naturally occurring silcretes, which in their un-heated forms are less workable (Mourre et al., 2010). The Brown et al. experiments added another cognitive / technological marker to the accumulating list of characteristics (including mastic production, projectile weapons technologies, site maintenance behaviors and the production of symbolic objects) showing that MSA humans had well developed………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

Learning by Doing: My first field school experience, Part ISource: http://bit.ly/1koHOe1
Learning by Doing is this month’s theme for Campus Archaeology. While there are many aspects to “learning by doing” in archaeology, our first post focuses on the archaeological field school. Every archaeologist knows that you never truly appreciate the field of archaeology until your first hands-on experience. The archaeological field school will either confirm your aspirations of being an archaeologist, you’ll find that you love the feel of the dirt under your nails and the sweat dripping down your back, or you will sadly discover that six weeks every summer of manual labor………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
Learning by Doing: My first field school experience, Part I
Source: http://bit.ly/1koHOe1

Learning by Doing is this month’s theme for Campus Archaeology. While there are many aspects to “learning by doing” in archaeology, our first post focuses on the archaeological field school. Every archaeologist knows that you never truly appreciate the field of archaeology until your first hands-on experience. The archaeological field school will either confirm your aspirations of being an archaeologist, you’ll find that you love the feel of the dirt under your nails and the sweat dripping down your back, or you will sadly discover that six weeks every summer of manual labor………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

A Prehistoric A-Z: Arbor LowSource: http://bit.ly/1matjwN
In the latest installment of our series looking at ancient monuments around the UK, Katherine (Cait) Range takes us to the wilds of the Peak District, Derbyshire, to look at the enigmatic site of Arbor Low. 
Arbor Low
Arbor Low, near Bakewell in Derbyshire, is often referred to as the “Stonehenge of the North”, and like that famous monument, Arbor Low has been a place of reverence for many generations. Situated on a hill with magnificent views over the Derbyshire countryside, the site cannot fail to impart some of the power and mysticism our ancestors must have felt when looking………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
A Prehistoric A-Z: Arbor Low
Source: http://bit.ly/1matjwN

In the latest installment of our series looking at ancient monuments around the UK, Katherine (Cait) Range takes us to the wilds of the Peak District, Derbyshire, to look at the enigmatic site of Arbor Low.  Arbor Low Arbor Low, near Bakewell in Derbyshire, is often referred to as the “Stonehenge of the North”, and like that famous monument, Arbor Low has been a place of reverence for many generations. Situated on a hill with magnificent views over the Derbyshire countryside, the site cannot fail to impart some of the power and mysticism our ancestors must have felt when looking………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

Pottery Project guest Blog: Pottery on the move.Source: http://bit.ly/1hPKbHc
Guest blog by Margaret Serpico
In our fifth in the series on different perspectives on Egyptian pottery Mararet Serpico, Curator of Virtual Resources at the Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, looks at the topic of transporting commodities.
I never cease to be amazed by the lengths ancient Egyptians and their neighbours went to transport goods back and forth to each other around the Mediterranean. Especially when it involved moving small, delicate pottery containers or, alternatively, large pottery storage jars (which even empty weigh a lot!) over great distances. We are lucky in the Petrie………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
Pottery Project guest Blog: Pottery on the move.
Source: http://bit.ly/1hPKbHc

Guest blog by Margaret Serpico In our fifth in the series on different perspectives on Egyptian pottery Mararet Serpico, Curator of Virtual Resources at the Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, looks at the topic of transporting commodities. I never cease to be amazed by the lengths ancient Egyptians and their neighbours went to transport goods back and forth to each other around the Mediterranean. Especially when it involved moving small, delicate pottery containers or, alternatively, large pottery storage jars (which even empty weigh a lot!) over great distances. We are lucky in the Petrie………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

Day 9 at Castle LawSource: http://bit.ly/1eN3tga
Thursday was a lovely sunny day and we had several site visits.  Alice Watterson and Kieran Baxter came out to do some photography.  Alice and Kieran are working with the SERF hillfort project to develop a multimedia visualisation of the results of our work (very exciting!)  (see http://digitaldirtvirtualpasts.wordpress.com/ & http://www.topofly.com/ for some of Alice and Kieran’s previous amazing work).Digging continued in full force in all trenches and we are making great progress.(image)Alice doing some pole photography(image)Kieran setting up his kite for more photos(image)Hard………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project
Day 9 at Castle Law
Source: http://bit.ly/1eN3tga

Thursday was a lovely sunny day and we had several site visits.  Alice Watterson and Kieran Baxter came out to do some photography.  Alice and Kieran are working with the SERF hillfort project to develop a multimedia visualisation of the results of our work (very exciting!)  (see http://digitaldirtvirtualpasts.wordpress.com/ & http://www.topofly.com/ for some of Alice and Kieran’s previous amazing work).Digging continued in full force in all trenches and we are making great progress.(image)Alice doing some pole photography(image)Kieran setting up his kite for more photos(image)Hard………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project